Yesterday warranted a little social distancing in the form of a hike up Mt. Garfield. You'll be pleased to know the flag is flying high. It is, however, in need of some tender loving care.

I couldn't stand it anymore, I had to get out and hike. It had been some time since my outings included a hike up Mt. Garfield. It was past time.

As you are probably aware, a group placed a new flagpole at the summit of Mt. Garfield a few years ago. Late yesterday evening I hiked to the summit to visit the flag. A few others used yesterday's good weather and warm temperature as an opportunity to make the same hike.

The flag has a light trained on it at night, and is well maintained. Winds are high and constant at this point of the Bookcliffs. As a result, a typical flag has a lifespan of about three months. I know for a fact the flag was replaced last July 4. The flag being displayed now most definitely isn't the same flag raised on July 4. It's been replaced at least once, probably more, since then.

Waylon Jordan

As you can see in the photos, the flag now being flown is nearing the end of its life. It's time for a new flag. It goes without saying the old flag will be taken down and destroyed in accordance with established protocols. Now all that is needed is a new flag (hint, hint).

Flags are pretty expensive, especially the higher-quality, larger flags used at this site. The flags like those you might find at the hardware store are typically too small, and given the material used, last only a matter of days in the high winds.

If you would care to donate a flag, I happen to know the individual who takes on the task of replacing them. Get in contact with me, and it will get done.

Regardless of what's going on in the world right now, you can feel good knowing the American flag is flying high, keeping a watch over the valley.

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