Here's to you, Josh Sanders. He just set the world record by climbing ten Colorado 14ers in one day. Not only is it a world record, it seems to be something of a miracle.

How did he pull this off? Well, he started at the stroke of midnight and then proceeded to hike continuously for the next 23 hours and 33 minutes. How far did he ultimately walk? Only 45 miles.

I'm wondering how this is possible. I'm certainly not disputing it happened. It simply seems impossible. Please consider the following.

According to Reference.com, the average human walking speed is 3.1 miles per hour. Per my math, Josh would have had to have maintained a constant speed of at least 1.9 miles per hour to complete his task. These are 14ers we're talking about. He wasn't walking some lovely trail along a creek, or power walking at the mall.

When I climb Mt. Garfield, I average about one-and-a-half hours. That's a two-mile walk ascending 2,000 feet. That's only 1.33333333 miles per hour. Let me assure you, I can only make this walk once a day. After that, it's off to Denny's and then nappy time. There's no way I'm doing that for 24 hours straight.

What are the rules when it comes to setting this record? There are a few. According to 9News.com:

  • Climbers must follow the Colorado rule
  • Climbers must ascend and descend 3,000 feet on each mountain, or group of mountains, for it to count

Did he ever get bummed during the ordeal? At one point he encountered a false summit, and it gave him a case of the blues. According to 9News.com, Josh said, "I was tired from 21 and a half hours just consistent movement through the mountains, up the passes, up the ridges, and really, there was a moment when I was traversing the saddle and thought I had gotten to the summit of Oxford, but once I got up - realized it was a false summit and I saw it looming seemingly a half mile in the distance that was probably the lowest point."

Getting burned by a false summit is really a drag. In any event, he made it and set the record with a handful of minutes to spare.