Halloween is one of the best times of the year for kids and adults alike.

It's the only time you can dress up in any way you want and go get candy and no one says a thing except how cool your costume is.

But as cool as costumes are, the big reason we go out on Halloween is that awesome chocolate rush. And I got curious so I thought I would see what the favorite candy was through the decades and see how much Halloween has changed.

1920s -The Baby Ruth Candy Bar

Despite thoughts to the contrary, this candy was NOT named after Babe Ruth, the baseball player, but President Cleveland's daughter, Ruth. Because she wasn't a baby when it came out, many think the company used the Baby part to capitalize on the slugger's rising fame. Reese's Peanut Butter Cups also came out in the 1920s.

1930s - Candy inside Candy

Who would have thought putting candy inside candy would be so popular? Pretty much everyone. The Tootsie Pop, for example, debuted in the 1930s. The Three Musketeers Bar was originally a three flavor candy bar, with chocolate, vanilla and strawberry, which is how it got its name.

1940s - M&M's

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Candy sales tended to fall in the summer because, well, heat melts chocolate. Then along came M&Ms and the game changed. The candy was only given to America's fighting men overseas until after World War Two, then everyone fell in love with them. Melts in your mouth, not in your hand!

1950s - Childhood favorites make a return

Atomic Fireballs were the rage in the 50s, as were Necco wafers and, yes, licorice. Kids of the 50's fell in love with older candies for a time, and Atomic Fireballs were at the top of the list.

1960s - SweeTARTS

Those and other candies like Mike and Ike and Starburst found popularity as well. Sugary and tart flavor was in. And kids loved it. They still do.

1970s - Laffy Taffy

Add in Poprocks, FizzyZots and Blow Pops and you have the ultimate Halloween give out for the 70s. Laffy Taffy was awesome because of the jokes it had on the wrappers. They were horrible, but you didn't care.

1980s - Skittles

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Need I say more? Still a huge favorite on Halloween night in Colorado. Or anywhere else for that matter. You will also remember Ring Pops, Runts, Nerds and Sour Patch candy.

1990s - Airheads

Airheads were introduced in the 1980's but did not really become popular until the 90's. Baby Bottle Pops, PushPops and the ultimate sour candy, the insane Warheads. Took me to pucker city more than once.

Today - Reeses Peanut Butter Cups

Even though they have been around since the 1920s, PBC's are today one of the most popular candies around. Kit Kats, Snickers and M&M's are still hugely popular as well.

I hope you enjoyed your sweet trip back in time.